Sunday, March 31, 2013

MY 7TH GREAT GRANDFATHER, EDWARD BAKER: A FOUNDING FATHER AND PIOUS PURITAN OF LYNN (SAUGUS), MASSACHUSSETTS


My 7th Great Grandfather, Edward Baker of Lynn (Saugus), Massachussetts:

His children and grandchildren, etc.,  settled up and down the East coast and became founding citizens of New Hampshire and Maine communities and many other areas as well and featured prominently in many historic events.

My last direct Baker surname ancestor was my grandmother's mother, my great grandmother: Mary Helen Baker.

From Savage: "EDWARD, Lynn 1630, freem. 14 Mar. 1638, had w. Jane, certainly five sons, perhaps other ch. besides, dau Mary, wh. m. 7 Nov. 1662, George Sumner of Dorchester, hav. foll. her to Northampton where Baker liv. many yrs. Leav. son Joseph and Timothy at Northampton whose names are misprinted Batter in Geneal. Reg. IX. 88; he went back to Lynn there d. Mar. 1687, giv. estate there to son John of Dedham, Edward, and Thomas, of Lynn. EDWARD, Lynn, son of the preced. m. 7 Apr. 1685, Mary, d. of Capt. John Marshall, was ens. of the milit. and freem. 1691."


Name: Edward Baker 
Year: 1630  
Place: Lynn, Massachusetts  
Source Publication Code: 1262  
Primary Immigrant: Baker, Edward 
Annotation: Date and place of settlement or date and place of arrival. Names not restricted to the Order of Founders and Patriots of America.  
Source Bibliography: COLKET, MEREDITH B., JR. Founders of Early American Families: Emigrants from Europe, 1607-1657. Cleveland: General Court of the Order of Founders and Patriots of America, 1975. 366p.  
Page: 13  

The name Baker, as one would guess, originates as many good English names do, from trades held by some distant ancestor.  Little is known of Edward's forebears at this time, though perhaps with internet capability and ydna it will one day be possible to trace Edward back through earlier generations in England. Quoting from the Introduction to the Genealogy of Edward Baker, by Nelson M. Baker, ca. 1851, "From what we have seen and heard, we have formed the idea that a representative man of these men (Baker}  would be tall, stalwart, inclining sometimes to corpulency with increasing years, having hair and a beard with a slight shade of red, eyes of gray or neutral flint, a complexion somewhat florid and a general dignified appearance."  How much the author knew of genetic variability playing havoc with his nice theory is hard to know, although he does allow that "of course physical features, as well as other characteristics are now well nigh lost, as such, among the numerous intermarriages of later generations."  


From the History of Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts, including Lynnfield, Saugus, Swampscott and Nahant, 1629-1864, by Alonzo Lewis and James Newhall,  Lynn: published at the bookstore of George C. Herbert, 1890, Chapter 2, Vol 1, p. 114 and 116-118:

1630:  Early in the spring, eleven vessels, having on board about seventeen hundred persons, left the harbor of Southampton, and sailed for New England. In the number of the passengers were Mr.John Winthrop, the first governor of Massachusetts, with many other persons of dignity, wealth, and reputation. As Mr. Humfrey, who had been chosen deputy governor, was not ready to remove, Mr. Thomas Dudley was chosen in his stead. In the month of June, the ships arrived at Salem, and the passengers began to make settlements in the pathless woods. Mr. Dudley says that some of them settled upon the river of Saugus.  Others went to Charlestown and Boston; and the rest began new settlements at Roxbury, Dorchester, Watertown, and Medford. The Council had agreed that each person who advanced fifty pounds, should have 200 acres; and that each one who came over on his own expense, should have 50 acres. The following persons appear to have arrived at Lynn, this year: ........EDWARD BAKER - was a farmer, and lived on the south side of Baker's Hill, in Saugus. He was admitted a freeman in 1638; and was buried March 16, 1687. His wife, Joan, died April 9, 1693. His sons were Edward, who married Mary Marshall,  April 7,1675; and Thomas, who married Mary Lewis, July 10, 1689. Mr. Baker removed to Northampton about 1658, and there had grants of land. He remained many years, respected and influential.  Mr. Lewis is incorrect in one or two particulars. The name of Mr. Baker's wife was Jane, and he had five sons - Joseph, Timothy, Edward, Thomas, and John. He finally returned to Lynn; but his sons Joseph and Timothy remained at Northampton. John is supposed to have settled in Dedham, and become the head of an extensive family. The will of Mr. Baker is dated 16 Oct. 1685, and having previously provided for some of his children by deed, not all of them are named in it. He exhorts his family to live peaceable and pious lives, and desires for himself a decent funeral, suitable to his rank and quality while living. Timothy was a prominent man in Northampton, and some of his descendants became conspicuous; among them, Hon. Osmyn Baker, late member of Congress. Captain Thomas Baker, son of Timothy, just named, and of course a grandson of Edward, the early Lynn settler, was taken captive by the Indians, at Deerfield, on the terrible night of 29 Feb. 1704, and carried to Canada. He however, the next year, succeeded in effecting his escape. In or about the year 1715, he married Madam (Christine Otis) Le Beau, whose name figures somewhat in the history of that period. And the lives of both husband and wife furnish touching and romantic passages. She was a daughter of Richard Otis, of Dover, N. H., who, with one son and one daughter, was killed by the Indians on the night of 27 June, 1689, at the time they destroyed the place. She was then an infant of three months, and was, with her mother, carried captive to Canada and sold to the French. The priests took her, baptized her, and gave her the name of Christine. They educated her in the Romish faith, and she passed some time in a nunnery, not, however, taking the veil. At the age of sixteen she was married to a Frenchman, thus becoming Madam Le Beau, and became the mother of two or three children. Her husband died about 1713. And it was very soon after that her future husband, Capt. Baker, appears to have fallen in with her. He was attached to the commission detailed by Gov. Dudley, under John Stoddard and John Williams for the purpose of negotiating with the Marquis de Vaudreuil for the release of prisoners and to settle certain other matters, and went to Canada. From Stoddard's journal it appears that there was much trouble in procuring her release, and when it was obtained, her children were not allowed to go with her. Her mother was also opposed to her leaving Canada. After her return, Christine married Capt. Baker, and they went to reside at Brookfield, where they remained till 1733. They had several children, and among their descendants is Hon. John Wentworth, late member of Congress from Illinois. She became a protestant after marrying Capt. Baker, and substituted the name Margaret for Christine, though later in life she seems to have again adopted the latter. In 1727, her former confessor, Father Siguenot wrote her a gracious letter, expressing a high opinion of her and warning her against swerving from the faith in which she had been educated. He mentions the happy death of a daughter of hers who had married and lived in Quebec and also speaks of her mother, then living, and the wife of a Frenchman. This letter was shown to Gov. Burnet, and he wrote to her a forcible reply to the arguments it contained in favor of Romanism. And there are, or recently were, three copies of the letter and reply, in the Boston Atheneum. The mother of Christine had children by her French husband, and Philip, Christine's, half-brother, visited her at Brookfield. All the children of Capt. Baker and Christine, seven or eight in number, excepting the first, who was a daughter, bearing her mother's name, were born in Brookfield. There is no reason to doubt that the connection was a happy one. They held a very respectable position, and he was the first representative from Brookfield. He was, indeed, once tried before the Superior Court, at Springfield, in 1727, for blasphemy; but the jury acquitted him. The offence consisted in his remarking, while discoursing on God's providence in allowing Joseph Jennings, of Brookfield, to be made a justice of the peace, "If I had been with the Almighty I would have taught him better."  In 1733 Capt. Baker sold his farm in Brookfield. But this proved an unfortunate step, for the purchaser failed before making payment, and their circumstances became greatly reduced. They were a short time at Mendon, and also at Newport, R. I., before finally removing to Dover. Poor Christine, in 1735, petitioned the authorities of New Hampshire for leave to "keep a house of public entertainment "on the County road from Dover meeting house to Coebeco Boome." In this petition she signs her name Christine Baker," and mentions that she made a journey to Canada, in the hope of getting her children, "but all in vaine." A license was granted, and it seems probable that she kept the house a number of years. She died, at a great age, 23 Feb.1773, and an obituary notice appeared in the Boston Evening Post. The Mrs. Bean mentioned in the N. H. Hist. Colls. as having died, 6 Feb., 1826, at the age of a hundred years, was Mary, the daughter of Capt. Baker and Christine. She possessed her faculties to the last, and her eyesight was so perfect that she could, without glasses, see to thread a needle. Col. Benjamin Bean, of Conway, N. H., was a grandson of this aged granddaughter of Edward Baker, the Lynn settler. I have given this connected recital, though hardly knowing how to afford the space, not only on account of the romantic incidents touched upon, but also because it aptly illustrates occurrences frequent in those days."

Edward was our immigrant Baker ancestor coming with the Great Migration in the large fleet under Governor Winthrop landing in Boston and Salem June and July 1630, which brought 1700 settlers in 11 vessels. Some were from western England, but the greater number were from near and about London. In the Annals of Lynn, Essex Co., MA, 1630 Edward Baker is mentioned as one of the 1630 Winthrop fleet  emigrants to America and he is also listed in the Colonial Founders and Patriots Index.  Edward was admitted as a "freeman" on March 14, 1638. (one had to be created a freeman by the General Court before being able to vote or hold office and prior to 1651 one also had to be a member of the Congregational Church, but this was modified by British Royal order to allow a certificate from a member of the clergy attesting to upright character and conduct as sufficient).  Edward was an Englishman, a farmer and a Protestant, and by 1638 a Congregationalist, arriving in Boston/Salem and settling on the south side of Baker's Hill in Saugus (then Lynn) MA. The hill and street leading up the hill still bear his name in 2002. (It can be seen near the Saugus branch of the Eastern RR, although I think the RR is probably now the north suburban commuter line that runs from Boston to Rockport, MA, or Amtrak. This is two or  three miles from Lynn toward Newton, the Saugus librarian was able to give excellent directions.)  At some point Edward "removed" to Northampton and seems to have divided his Northampton property and Lynn property between his sons.  He returned to Baker Hill before his death. 


Source: Author: Baker, Nelson M.
Title: A Genealogy of the Descendants of Edward Baker of Lynn, MA, 1630
Publication: Syracuse, 1867
Available online at Google Books
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April, 2004, AEH, an unrelated genealogist who lives in Saugus, MA, writes:  "If I step out my front door and look East I see Baker Hill. It's changed radically in the last couple of years. When I was a kid (in the 40's) I used to pick blueberries up there. I also used to sit up there on the side of a small cliff and watch the planes at the small Revere Airport. Now it's all grown up. They took down the water tower (a long time landmark!) and are building houses on the ledges where we used to think nobody could ever build."
                               ***************************************
Also from the Annals of Lynn:

1638: The committee appointed by the town to divide the lands, completed their task, and a book was provided, in which the names of the proprietors, with the number of acres allotted to each, were recorded. That book is lost; but a copy of the first three pages has been preserved in the files of the Quarterly Court, at Salem, from which the following is transcribed. I have taken the justifiable liberty, in this instance, to spell the words correctly, and to supply a few omissions, which are included in brackets. The word  ten," which is added to many of the allotments, implies that a separate lot of ten acres was granted. [The first allotment, it will be seen, was to Lord Brook. And the Court, 13 Alarch, 1639, empower Edward Holyoke to manage the estate of his lordship, 11 vntill the Lord Brooke do otherwise dispose of it.]
These lands following were given to the inhabitants of the town of Lynn, Anno Domini 1638.
To the Right Honorable the Lord William Cowdrey, 60.
Brook, 800 acres, as it is estimated.                       Thomas Laigbton, 60.
                                                                   John Cooper, 200.
Mr. Thomas Willis, upland and                        Allen Breed, 200.
meadow, 500 acres, as it is estimated           John Pool, 200          
Edward Howe, 200 and ten.
Mr. Edward Holyoke, upland and                     Thomas Sayre, 60.
meadow, 500 acres, as it is estimated            Job Sayre, 60.
                                                                          Thomas Chadwell, 60.
Henry Collins, upland and meadow,                William Walton, 60. '
80 acres, arid ten.                                            Christopher Foster, 60.
Mr. [Joseph] Floyd, upland and mea-               William Ballard, 60.
dow, 60 acres, and ten.                                    Josias Stanbury, 100.
Edmund and Francis Ingalls, upland                Edmund Farrington, 200.
and meadow, 120 acres.                                   Nicholas Potter, 60.
Widow Bancroft, 100 acres.                             William Knight, 60.
Widow Hammond, 60 acres.                             Edward Tomlins, 200, and twenty.
George Burrill, 200 acres. [L6 Mr."] South, 100 John Wood, 100 acres.     
Boniface Burton, 60.
Thomas Talmage, 200. 1                                John Smith, 60.
Nicholas Brown, 200. 1                                   Mr. Edward Howell, 500.
Nicholas Batter, 60.                                         Edward Burebarn, 3(~, and ten.
Mr. [Richard] Sadler, 200, and the                  Anthony Newhall, 30.
                            rock by his house.               Thomas Newhall, 30. 
Joseph Armitage, 60.                                       Thomas Marshall, 30, and ten.
Godfrey Armitage, 60.                                     Michael Spenser, 30.
 To Matthew West, upland and mea-              Timothy Tomlins, 80.
     dow, 30, and ten.                                       [William] Harcher, 20.
George Farr, 30, and ten.                               Richard Roolton, 60.
James Boutwell, 60 acres.                            [Nathaniel] Handforth, 20.
Zachary Fitch, 30, and ten.                           Thomas Hudson, 60.
Jarrett Spenser, 30 acres.                             Thomas Halsye, 100.
Jenkin Davis, 30, and ten.                             Samiiel Bennett, 20.
George Taylor, 30, and ten.                          John Elderkin, 20.
[Williamil Thorn, 30, and ten.                         Abraham Belknap, 40.
Thomas Townsend, 60.                                  Robert Driver, 20.
Thomas Parker, 30, and ten.                          Joseph Rednap, 40.
Francis Lightfoot, 30, and ten.                        [John] Deacon, 20.
Richard Johnson, 30, and ten.                      Philip Kertland, senior, 10.
Robert Parsons, 30, and ten.
Philip Kertland, junior, 10.                               Nathaniel Wbiteridge, 10.
            sse, 10.                                               George Frail, 10
Edmund Bridges, 10.
Richard Longley, 10
Thomas Talmage, junior, 20.
Francis Godson, 30.                                      Thomas Coldam, 60.
George Welbye, -                                           Adam Hawkes, upland, 100.
WILLIAM PARTRIDGE, upland, 10 acres.  Thomas Dexter, 350.
Henry Gains, 40.                                            Daniel Howe, upland and meadow, 60 
Richard Wells, 10.                                   Richard Walker, upland and meadow, 200
[Josephl Pell, 10.                                                                                            
John White, 20.                          Ephraim Howe, next to the land of his fa. upland, 10                                                      
EDWARD BAKER, 40                                                  
James Axey, 40.                                          [Thomas] Ivory, 10.
William Edmonds, 10.                                  Timothy Cooper, 10.
Edward Treson, 10.                                     Samuel Hutchinson, 10, by estimation.
Jeremy Howe, 20.                                        Mr. Samuel Whiting, the pastor, 200.
William George, 20.                                     Mr. Thomas Cobbet, the teacher, 200.

     These three pages were taken out of the Town Book of the Records of
    Lynn, the 10th mo. Anno Domini, 59,60, [March 10, 1660), by me,
                      ANDREW MANSFIELD, Town Recorder.

Some have maintained Edward was the son of John Baker and was born January 11, 1606 in Chippenham, Wiltshire, England and baptized at Newton Ferrers in Devonshire, England in 1621.  Have not seen documentation of this, although many records on file at LDS.


Edward Baker is the ancestor of Governor Increase Sumner of Massachusetts, John Wentworth, Mayor of Chicago and IL Representative to Congress and Osmyn Baker, MA Representative to Congress.


A notation in the guest book of the historic Iron Works of Saugus, MA indicates that Edward Baker of Lynn was one of its original investors and a proprieter.  The Works did not operate long and was closed in the 1660s.


OATH OF ALLEGIANCE  which had to be taken by men, along with membership in the Congregational Church,  to be endowed with freeman status:

I --------- being (by Gods providence) an Inhabitant, and Freeman, within the jurisdiction of this Common-weath, doe freely acknowledge my selfe to bee subject to the government thereof; and therefore doe heere sweare, by the great & dreadful name of the Everliving-God, that I will be true & faithfull to the same, & will accordingly yield assistance & support therunto, with my person & estate, as in equity I am bound: and will also truely indeavour to maintaine and preserve all the libertyes & priviledges therf, submitting my selfe to the wholesome lawes, & ordres made & stablished by the same; and further, that I will not plot, nor practice any evill against it, nor consent to any that shall soe do, butt will timely discover, & reveall the to the publick weale of the body, without respect of personnes, or favour of any man, Soe help mee God in the Lord Jesus Christ.


Found this at Saugus Ironworks website:

From: Howard Faulkner
I am a descendant of Edward Baker, a principal of the Saugus Iron Works, who arrived in Saugus/Lynn about 1630 from Newton Ferrers, Devonshire, England. An area in Saugus at the time known as Baker's Hill was named after Edward Baker. If you have any further information about this person I would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks, HF


He responded to my email to him:

Edward b. in England in 1621 and came to Salem/Saugus in 1630. We continue to Edward's son Edward, followed by Marshall, Sherabiah, Eugene, Hillel, Ira and his daughter Nora Mabel Baker, my grandmother. All of these folks lived in MA. Unfortunately the details about the Iron Works are very slim. I have gone through some of the early Essex County court records and found Edward was mentioned several times. It seems that there was considerable difficulty in having sufficient expertise in Saugus at any one time to get the operation going. This took many years. One of the apparent problems was financing this operation. All the raw materials were available locally but the talent and equipment was another matter. It seems there were, as near as I can determine, about 13-14 men involved in financing/operating this venture. Unfortunately, they apparently were not jointly involved as a single ownership but rather 3-4 groups that each had a role/interest in supplying the talent and equipment. However, as two or three experts would arrive from England it seems they were always missing other men or materials and the first group could not afford to stay on with little or no payment. Therefore some would leave the operation to seek work elsewhere, further creating a labor shortage. Currently, the Saugus Iron Works, run by the National Park Service has very little information specific information available about the early beginnings of this operation.  I hope this is some help to you. I have little information about this family before Edward came to this country. However I do believe his father was John Baker.


In Vol. 1 of Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, p 378, the connection between Edward and the Ironworks is made: 

Court at Salem, 30 September 1654
"Edward Baker v. Mr. John Beckes and Company and Mr. John Jeffard, agent of the undertakers of Lyn. Debt.
Edward Baker deposed in court that he had received a part of the foregoing debt."  


In 1655 Edward Baker and Daniel Salmon were involved in a dispute with the undertakers of the ironworks at Lynn. The undertakers had acquired large tracts of land at Braintree, also for the production of iron, and in payment of debt some of this land was transferred to Baker and Salmon, including thirty acres which "the said undertakers bought and sometimes was the land of Barnaby Derreford" (aka Barnabus Dorryfall) [Suffolk Deeds,  SLR 2:266-70]


Will of John Baker, Husbandman of Hankerton, Wiltshire, Eng. 17 June 1629 PROB 11/156 


9th ggfs Edward Baker, Wm Partridge and Roger Shaw took the oath of freemen same time in Lynn, MA  March 14, 1638/39.


LYNN: Although herdsmen kept cattle on Nahant Neck as early as 1629, the first evidence we have for the existence of a town there was on 5 July 1631, when Saugus was included in a list of Massachusetts Bay towns that owed taxes [MBCR 1:89; GMN 1:19-22]. On 20 August 1637, Saugus is called Linn [MBCR 1:181]. The consistent placement of Lynn after Watertown and before Cambridge in the lists of deputies indicates that a town had arisen there by early in 1631.
NEGHS Great Migration Newsletter


ca. 1641: Edward Baker married Jane (sometimes seen as Joane), surname unknown at Lynn, Massachusetts.
"New England Marriages Prior to 1700" compiled by Clarence Almon Torrey; p. 32; Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc.; Baltimore, Maryland; 1985 (974.0 NEa/Marriage SCGS)  Thus there may have been a first wife, mother of the older children.


Baker Ydna Project & the Genealogy of Edward Baker of Lynn, MA
Haplogroup R1b1b2a1b5
A Baker surnamed descendant of Edward Baker joined the Baker Ydna project in January 2010, as a representative of the Edward Baker (abt 1610-1689) and his son Lt. Timothy Baker (1645- 1727) of the Lynn & Northampton, MA line.  He is a 37 marker match with 6 descendants of Timothy Baker (1675- 1747) of Maidenhead, NJ, meaning with 90-plus% certainty that these men share a common Baker ancestor within 12 or fewer generations. 


With his first wife Grace Marsh, (born Hartford, CT, daughter of Gov. John Marsh of Connecticut, a founder of Hartford and Anne Webster, later of Hadley, Hampshire, MA) our Lt. Timothy Baker had a son named Timothy b. abt 1675  Their first child, Grace Baker, b. late 1672 or early 1673 d. February, 1673. Grace Marsh Baker died May 1676. Their deaths are a matter of Northampton town record.  It had long been thought young Timothy must have died early as well, despite the fact that no town record is found.  Ydna evidence shows that in fact that Timothy, Jr. must have survived and was probably raised by someone from his mother's family. Furthermore we know Timothy Baker, Jr. was alive at age 12-13 when he is mentioned as an heir in his maternal grandfather John Marsh's will written October 1688.  This is an exciting revelation for anyone interested in the Edward Baker line. 


From other trees, but no doc. that either of these are immigrant to Lynn, MA
Name: Edwardus Baker 
Gender: Male 
Birth Date: abt 1613 
Christening Date: 2 Feb 1613 
Christening Place: Mavesyn Ridware, Staffordshire, England 
Father's Name: Johannis Baker 


Edward Baker
Birth 11 Jan 1608
Lavenham, Suffolk, , England 
Death: 16 Mar 1687
Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States 



Baker Hill, Lynn (Saugus), Massachusetts in 1992.  Named after my 7th Great Grandfather, Edward Baker.Baker Hill, Lynn (Saugus), Massachusetts in 1992. Named after my 7th Great Grandfather, Edward Baker.


Baker Street, Lynn (Saugus), Massachussetts; named after my 7th Great Grandfather, Edward Baker.  Baker Sreet is at the bottom of Baker Hill.Baker Street, Lynn (Saugus), Massachussetts; named after my 7th Great Grandfather, Edward Baker. Baker Sreet is at the bottom of Baker Hill.


My last direct Baker surname ancestor, my great grandmother, Mary Helen Baker (Browne)My last direct Baker surname ancestor, my great grandmother, Mary Helen Baker (Browne)

The John Simon Baker Family:  my grandma's maternal grandparents and their children...my 2nd great grandparents and my great grand aunts and uncles...John and his son, George, were both prominent citizens in their small town in Minnesota.  George started up a local bank and was president of that institution for many years.  John was a Civil War hero and was injured in the war.  He could hear the soldiers tramping by on their march to Atlanta as he lay in his hospital bed.  Years later John desired to return to Tennessee and visit some land purchased by his son-in-law (my great grandfather, George Browne).  While he was there, he suffered a heart attack and died in Hillsboro.  John's lineage descends directly from King Henry II of England, who was my 22nd great grandfather; (and many more generations are recorded even further back than that).  There are biographies written about George and others in which John is included.  Hannah's grandfather, Zedekiah South, fought in the Revolutionary War.  Online archives have records of Zedekiah including a receipt for shoed he acquired for his troops and his pension information.  He was my 4th great grandfather.
Parents seated:  John S. Baker, born Dec. 29, 1841 in Fayetteville, New York, died Dec. 21, 1912 in Hillsboro, Tennessee; Hannah Maria (South) Baker, born Oct. 15, 1845, Springville, New York, died Sept. 13, 1935 in Redwood Falls, Minnesota.  
Children (back row, left to right): George, born July 5, 1871; Lucy, born July 21, 1867, and Mary Helen (my grandma's mother), born July 23, 1869 in Blue Earth, Minnesota, died Nov. 1935 in Auburn, California.  
Children (front row, left to right):  Florence Ansley, Born July 10, 1880 and Ella Delora, born Sept. 10, 1876 .
Photo taken at the photography studio of Olson & Anderson, in Montevideo, Minnesota.The John Simon Baker Family: my grandma's maternal grandparents and their children...my 2nd great grandparents and my great grand aunts and uncles...John and his son, George, were both prominent citizens in their small town in Minnesota. George started up a local bank and was president of that institution for many years. John was a Civil War hero and was injured in the war. He could hear the soldiers tramping by on their march to Atlanta as he lay in his hospital bed. Years later John desired to return to Tennessee and visit some land purchased by his son-in-law (my great grandfather, George Browne). While he was there, he suffered a heart attack and died in Hillsboro. John's lineage descends directly from King Henry II of England, who was my 22nd great grandfather; (and many more generations are recorded even further back than that). There are biographies written about George and others in which John is included. Hannah's grandfather, Zedekiah South, fought in the Revolutionary War. Online archives have records of Zedekiah including a receipt for shoed he acquired for his troops and his pension information. He was my 4th great grandfather. Parents seated: John S. Baker, born Dec. 29, 1841 in Fayetteville, New York, died Dec. 21, 1912 in Hillsboro, Tennessee; Hannah Maria (South) Baker, born Oct. 15, 1845, Springville, New York, died Sept. 13, 1935 in Redwood Falls, Minnesota. Children (back row, left to right): George, born July 5, 1871; Lucy, born July 21, 1867, and Mary Helen (my grandma's mother), born July 23, 1869 in Blue Earth, Minnesota, died Nov. 1935 in Auburn, California. Children (front row, left to right): Florence Ansley, Born July 10, 1880 and Ella Delora, born Sept. 10, 1876 . Photo taken at the photography studio of Olson & Anderson, in Montevideo, Minnesota.
(This version of the photo from a little further away to include photography studio logo). My Great Grand Aunt Ella Delora Baker (Silvernale) born Sept. 10, 1876; my Grandma's Aunt (her mother's sister).  Ahhh, the Baker line, a wonderful thing, so well documented.  I love it...Some of Ella's great grandparents were Obadiah Bardwell, Mehitable Smith and Zedekiah South!  Love the names....(This version of the photo from a little further away to include photography studio logo). My Great Grand Aunt Ella Delora Baker (Silvernale) born Sept. 10, 1876; my Grandma's Aunt (her mother's sister). Ahhh, the Baker line, a wonderful thing, so well documented. I love it...Some of Ella's great grandparents were Obadiah Bardwell, Mehitable Smith and Zedekiah South! Love the names....

The Baker sisters:  My Great Grandmother (sitting on left) Mary Helen Baker (Browne) born July 23, 1869 in Blue Earth, Minnesota, died Nov. 1935 in Auburn, California, aged 66; and my Great Grand Aunts Lucy Baker (Onstad) (sitting on right) born July 21, 1867, died Dec. 1896 at the age of 29; Ella Delora Baker (Silvernale) (standing on left) born Sept. 10, 1876; and Florence Ansley Baker (Landon) (standing on right) born July 10, 1880.  Photo taken in Dawson Minnesota shortly before Lucy's death.  Their mother was Hannah Maria South.  Their father was John Wesley Baker.  The Baker line is very well detailed and documented in a published genealogy of which I have a copy and to which my Grandma added a supplement.  It traces the family in detail back to my 8th Great Grandfather Edward Baker who came to America on the Winthrop fleet in 1630 and was a prominent founding father of Lynn, Massachussetts, USA (now Saugus).  Baker's Hill, which is a suburb of Boston, retains his name to this day.The Baker sisters: My Great Grandmother (sitting on left) Mary Helen Baker (Browne) born July 23, 1869 in Blue Earth, Minnesota, died Nov. 1935 in Auburn, California, aged 66; and my Great Grand Aunts Lucy Baker (Onstad) (sitting on right) born July 21, 1867, died Dec. 1896 at the age of 29; Ella Delora Baker (Silvernale) (standing on left) born Sept. 10, 1876; and Florence Ansley Baker (Landon) (standing on right) born July 10, 1880. Photo taken in Dawson Minnesota shortly before Lucy's death. Their mother was Hannah Maria South. Their father was John Wesley Baker. The Baker line is very well detailed and documented in a published genealogy of which I have a copy and to which my Grandma added a supplement. It traces the family in detail back to my 8th Great Grandfather Edward Baker who came to America on the Winthrop fleet in 1630 and was a prominent founding father of Lynn, Massachussetts, USA (now Saugus). Baker's Hill, which is a suburb of Boston, retains his name to this day.

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